Pablo Pauly: “We actors fabricate lies to make them real in the eyes of the public”

The young actor has finally landed a leading role with “Three nights a week”. And also appears on the poster of the comedy “Petaouchnok”.

There are encounters with a role that mark the actors forever. Released in 2017, “Patients” will change the life of Pablo Pauly, who plays a young quadriplegic, victim of an accident, and his slow reconstruction.

The film by Mehdi Idir and Grand Corps Malade (inspired by its own story) becomes the surprise success of that year, exceeding one million spectators. And for Pablo Pauly, a sudden explosion and a César nomination for best young hope. We already see him as an actor on whom the cinema will have to rely.

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Pablo Pauly was interested in drag, “a real form of burlesque art, which also aims to create an alter ego to get better”

It will however be necessary to wait five years to find him headlining in “Three nights a week”, by Florent Gouëlou, where his character falls in love with a dragqueen. A film full of finesse on a subject that is certainly trendy but necessarily puzzling. “Homosexuality is not a stake, it is a film on the love which is born, on the acceptance of oneself. Baptiste will just fall in love with a woman, then with the man behind it. He will leave his partner and follow him into the world of drag. »

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At his side, the impressive Romain Eck alias Cooky Kunty. And the tender and desperate writing of Gouëlou. Pablo Pauly became interested in drag, “a real form of burlesque art, which also aims to create an alter ego to get better,” he continues.

Playing a homophobe or a racist wouldn’t bother me. You have to explore to understand

From there to see a parallel with the profession of actor? “No, I do not think so. We actors fabricate lies to make them real in the eyes of the audience. They must have lied to each other before finding their truth.

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Hyperactive and a dunce at school, Pablo Pauly has found his raison d’être in acting. If an actor cannot play everything, he considers that he must always have the desire to do so: “Embodying a homophobe or a racist wouldn’t bother me. You have to explore to understand, even these characters.”

An inveterate film buff, Pauly quotes Charles Laughton, Kubrick and Paul Thomas Anderson

Passed by the conservatories of Paris and London, he discovers the texts, plays “Hamlet”. And takes his time after the success of “Patients”, “for lack of confidence, surely”. He accumulates supporting roles, from comedy (“Murder Party”) to Anne Fontaine’s cinema through social film (“Les invisibles”, by Louis-Julien Petit).

An inveterate cinephile, Pauly cites Charles Laughton, Kubrick and Paul Thomas Anderson as benchmarks and stuffs his conversations with film replicas, to the chagrin of those close to him. He shot in “The French Dispatch”, by Wes Anderson, and remembers, dazzled, his first day in makeup with Bill Murray, Mathieu Amalric or Tilda Swinton.

Pauly is teeming with projects

The thirties finally seem to give him wings since he is also on the poster for “Petaouchnok”, joyfully crazy comedy where he rubs shoulders with Pio Marmaï, Camille Chamoux and Philippe Rebbot. And Pauly is teeming with projects: an appearance in Laetitia Masson’s next film, a camera by Jérôme Bonnell opposite Camélia Jordana, before finding Benjamin Voisin (“Lost Illusions”) in a portrait of the creators of the pink telephone. Two first roles in a row. Finally!

“Three nights a week” and “Petaouchnok”, currently in theaters.

Pablo Pauly: “We actors fabricate lies to make them real in the eyes of the public”