Ferris Bueller’s Day Off Ferrari sells for $377,000 at auction | Pretty Reel

The movie prop was one of three built for the John Hughes film.

Paramount Pictures

Heritage Auctions sold Ferris Bueller’s Day Off Ferrari 250 GT California at auction on December 17. At least the last one was. Three cars were made for the film, and this was the last available for purchase. You can’t actually drive the Ferrari because, according to Entertainment Weekly, it’s missing the engine and transmission because it’s not an actual car. It was a film prop designed for use in the film and rebuilt to be a display piece after filming.

For those who haven’t seen the film, it follows a high school student named Ferris Bueller (Mathew Broderick) as he decides to take a day off from school. He calls on his friend Cameron Frye (Alan Ruck) and convinces him to take his father’s Ferrari out for the day. Cameron is initially reluctant because his father is very bossy and it’s his most prized possession.

A famous sequence in the film involves two valets, played by Richard Edson and Larry “Flash” Jenkins, who go for a ride through the city to the tune of Star Wars. Naturally, this drives up the car’s mileage, which infuriates Cameron, which is ironically almost immediately after Cameron compliments the valets on their friendliness.

They lift the car and spin it in reverse to reduce the mileage again. However, after deciding to stand up to his father, Cameron accidentally “kills” the car by kicking it until it comes out of the pit and out the garage window. The Ferrari that has just been purchased is the one used for this scene.

Oh yes

Paramount Pictures

Here is a description of the car on the auction site:

“It consists of a fiberglass body bolted to a rolling chassis with a cosmetically finished interior with tan vinyl seats, tan carpeting, a matte black fiberglass instrument panel with instrumentation and a trimmed steering wheel. of wood with a replica of the “Prancing Horse” logo in the center. The tires are mounted on chrome wheels. There is no engine or transmission present. Being an accessory, the hood has no hinges and sits in place. Both door latches are present but need to be adjusted. The trunk lid does not have a latch. The right front headlight lens is present, but is cracked and remains loose; the rear passenger side taillight lens is missing. Chrome trim and side mirror have pitting and oxidation. The vinyl seats were upholstered and the red paint was resprayed after production. The paint has minor nicks with a 3″ section of paint missing on the hood. Three D-rings are installed behind the seats with a steel bracket under the hood for the purpose of hanging for display. »

Heritage Auctions sold this Ferrari for $337,500, considerably less than the “hero” driving car used in the same film. Scottsdale Battett-Jackson Collector Car Auction sold this one for $396,000 in 2020. For a frame of reference, the most expensive car ever sold at auction was the 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder from Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow from 1963.

Ferris Bueller’s Day Off Ferrari sells for $377,000 at auction | Pretty Reel