Veterinary Medical College refutes a Sernac study that revealed a 3,400% gap in prices

“The Sernac study, which we support in its research stage, exposes a grotesque variation between veterinary clinics for the same ‘service’,” said the union.

The National Consumer Service (Sernac) alerted the population about the enormous differences, of up to 3,400%, in the value of a veterinary consultation for the attention of a pet, whose minimum price was $1,000 and a maximum of $35,000.

Andrés Herrera, director of the organization, pointed out that “pets today are part of many families and their adoption even increased during the pandemic for company. That is why it is important that consumers have adequate information to choose the best option when hiring a veterinary service”.

It should be remembered that Law 21,020, known as the “Cholito Law”, obliges people who have pets to comply with a series of conditionsin which veterinary care is important.

The analysis considered information submitted by 141 veterinarians belonging to 35 communes for a total of 3,759 service prices. Veterinary services are categorized into 4 types of establishments: veterinary clinics, veterinary medical center, private medical consultation and veterinary hospital.

In the case of microchip implantation, the minimum value reaches $7,000 and a maximum of $60,000 (757% difference). For the rabies vaccine for dogs, the minimum value is $6,000 and a maximum of $36,000. That is, 500% between both prices.

    • Review the Sernac study here:

Colmevet criticizes procedure

The Chilean Veterinary Medical College (Colmevet) strongly criticized the procedure carried out by Sernac regarding price differences in consultations.

The Sernac study, which we supported in its research stage, exposes a grotesque variation between veterinary clinics for the same ‘service’. However, it is not capable of showing the true debate on Veterinary Medicine in Chile; that there is a lack of regulation, which we have denounced and pursued as Colmevet, but where the will to provide solutions does not exist on the part of the governments and in Congress we have been waiting for 5 years for our inclusion in the Sanitary Code to be approved and, now, a state entity like Sernac only acts because of a headline,” began María José Ubilla, national president of the Chilean Veterinary Medical College.

“We are very used to Fonasa standardizing health benefits, but this does not happen in veterinary medicine. This lack of standardization affects how veterinary medical services are sold. The analysis by “name” of the service offered is useless since there is no catalog of veterinary medical services”, she added.

Ubilla closed by saying that “as a Veterinary Medical College we have been emphatic on the need to correct many aspects related to the profession, which must be addressed from the One Health perspective, where the relationship between human, animal and environmental health must be considered as a pillar for decision-making and for the regulation, today dispersed, of rules and laws, which are largely inapplicable due to the lack of economic and human resources, as well as because there is no coherent articulation between them”.

Veterinary Medical College refutes a Sernac study that revealed a 3,400% gap in prices